Little pieces of Morgen's fiction

Category Archives: dialogue

An American Werewolf in London

222 underground 568159“Brian.”

“Sorry?”

“The name’s Brian… Latham.”

“Oh, hi. Donald Varda.”

“Canadian?”

“American. Do I sound Canadian?”

“To be honest, I don’t know the difference. It’s like Australia and New Zealand but if you call Kiwis Ozzies they don’t like it. The same for-”

“Kiwis? Ozzies?”

“New Zealanders. Australians.”

“OK. And what do you call us?”

“Yanks.”

“Oh yeah, that’s right. So what are ‘Poms’?”

“That’s what Australians call us. Can’t remember why now.”

“I didn’t think people talked to each other on trains but I guess you Brits are more open than we give you credit for. We don’t in the States.”

“It’s a shame, isn’t it? Even just a few stops, it’s worth saying something.”

“Sure.”

“I see a lot of the same people in here every morning, every evening, and they never talk. Who knows what they might have in common. So, are you in London on business or pleasure, Donald?”

“A bit of both.”

“That’s nice. What do you do?”

“I’m a werewolf.”

“Pardon me?”

“A werewolf.”

“I thought that’s what you said. You, er… make a living out of being a, er… werewolf?”

“Not as much as you’d think.”

“It’s not something I’ve ever thought about. You’re the first one I’ve met… This is for a play or something, right?”

“Of course. Oh my God, you didn’t think I actually am a werewolf!”

“You do look the part, I have to say. I’ve never seen eyes quite like yours and you’ve even got eyebrows that meet in the middle.”

“They’re real.”

“Wow. So you were born for that part then really, weren’t you.”

“You could say that.”

“Tottenham Court Road. This is my stop.”

“Mine too. You in the theatre, Brian?”

“No. I’m an accountant. My office is at the top of Grape Street, just off Shaftesbury Avenue. Do you know it?”

“No, sorry.”

“It’s a fairly small road. You probably wouldn’t have noticed it, unless you’re Cuban.”

“Why Cuban?”

“Their Embassy’s there, at the other end of the road. We do accounts for a couple of the theatres but no, just a desk job, nothing half as exciting as being on stage, performing in front of all those people. I used to meet people. I sold hoovers. You know, vacuum cleaners.”

“Oh, yeah.”

“Just part-time, while I was studying. Before that I was a Catering Assistant but I love numbers so ended up doing what I do now. It’s funny what fate has in store, isn’t it?”

“It is, indeed.”

“The ticket goes face up, with the strip… that’s it.”

“Thanks.”

“So how long are you here for?”

“I don’t really know. I’m just going to see what happens. If everyone’s as friendly as you, I think I’ll stay a while.”

“That’s nice. I’ve lived in London all my life, wouldn’t want to leave. There’s a guy at work who’s from America. California, I think. Can’t understand why he’d swap the sun for rainy old London. Actually it’s not as wet as everybody thinks.”

“It’s been nice so far.”

“You’ve picked the best time; July, August. Busy time for your show as well, I guess, lots of tourists wanting to see the sights. Everyone goes to the theatre when they’re in London.”

“I’m hoping so.”

“OK, this is me, top of Grape Street. Just down there. Red door on the right. See it? Oh. Sure I’ll show you. If you keep going to the end and turn right, Shaftesbury Avenue is the next right. I don’t remember seeing your play being advertised anywhere. Working where I do, I can’t usually escape the posters.”

“We’re doing rehearsals at the moment. Won’t be out for a while.”

“Here we are then. Well, Donald, it’s been great chatting with you. I hope your play, and stay, go well. I might see if I can pop along. You know, once it airs, so to speak.”

“I’m not sure there are any tickets left.”

“Really? I thought you said. Never mind. Maybe next time. I’ll look out for you.”

“I’m not hard to miss.”

“No, and… oh look, you’ve even got the teeth.”

“I have.”

“They are rather magnificent. Erm… What are you… Donald? What? No!”

***

Picture above courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.

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They try to with the food

220 cherry pie 185705“Cherry Pie, John?”

“Yes, Miriam.”

“No stones?”

“No, Miriam.”

“Thank you, John.”

“You’re welcome.”

“Oh yes… it’s still warm. Well done you.”

“Shall I put the kettle on?”

“That would be lovely.”

“Right you are.”

Miriam knew the pie would taste even better with the tea but didn’t want it to get cold so took a bite and savoured it until she heard the kettle boil.

“Are you not having any tea, John?”

“I have to go back to work.”

“This late?”

“We’re a doctor down so I’ve been seeing more patients, more paperwork. Don’t wait up.”

*

Had Miriam looked out the window or waved her husband goodbye from the front door, she would have seen him turn left instead of right as he should have done to go to the surgery. Of course John knew she’d still be sitting on the sofa as she did every Monday and Thursday evening when he brought her cherry pie.

*

“Oh, John!”

“Oh, Sheila!”

“That was wonderful.”

“It was.”

“When are you going to leave Miriam?”

“Soon.”

“How soon?”

“Soon, my darling.

“You know I have a business trip next week.”

“I do and I shall miss you dreadfully.”

“You will?”

“Of course. You know I only want to be with you.”

“Then leave her.”
“I shall.”

“While I’m away. If you’ve not left her when I come back then we’re over.”

“Sheila!”

“I mean it.”

“OK.”

“OK?”

“Yes, my darling.”

“You will?”

“I will.”

“While I’m away.”

“Yes.”

“Oh, John!”

“Oh, Sheila!”

*

“Hello, McNeill.”

“Hello, Doctor Castle.”

“Do you have…”

“I do, sir. You did want this strength, didn’t you?”

“I did.”

“They’re quite lethal in the wrong hands.”

“Just as well they’re in mine.”

“Fair point. There we are then.”

“Thank you, McNeill.”

“Good day, sir.”

*

“I’m home!”

“Goodie. Do you have it?”

“I have, Miriam, still warm.”

“Thank you, dear.”

“You’re welcome.”

“Work again, tonight?”

“Not tonight, no. I thought I might go to the club though.”

“You do work so hard.”

“You don’t mind?”

“Not at all. There’s a really good program about dung beetles just about to start.”

“That’s nice dear. I’ll make you a cup of tea first though, yes?”

“Not tonight, John, not thirsty.”

“Alright then.”

“…Not hungry either,” she said when she heard the front door slam.

*

The program it turns out was less interesting than Miriam had hoped and she’d swiftly fallen asleep only to be disturbed by a visitor who hadn’t stayed long.

*

“It’s last orders, Doctor Castle, would you like another?”

“Better not, Derek.”

“Will we be seeing you tomorrow for the bridge match?”

“I’m not sure. I’ll know better when I get home.”

“Not a problem, Doctor Castle. Have a good night, sir.”

“Thank you, Derek.”

*

John Castle quietly let himself into his house and crept into the lounge. He smiled when he saw his wife sprawled across the sofa, eyes firmly shut. He looked at the coffee table and saw no pie.

He was leaning over her when her eyes sprang open and she screamed. He backed away just as violently.

“John! What were you doing?”

“Oh God! Er… sorry Miriam. I thought I saw…”

“What?”

“I don’t know, something moving, I’m not sure.”

“Where?”

“I think it’s gone.”

“Thank goodness.”

“Was your pie, nice?”

“I don’t know.”

“Oh? You’ve not eaten it yet?”

“I wasn’t hungry.”

“Never mind. You could have it now. I’ll put the kettle on.”

“No need.”

“For lunch tomorrow then.”

“If you buy me another.”

“Sorry?”

“I wasn’t hungry so I gave it away.”

“Gave it away? There was someone here?”

“Only for a few minutes. Was in a hurry. Had to catch a plane.”

“Really?”

“A business trip, she said.”

John swallowed hard. “She?”

“Oh, yes. Sheila, one of your receptionists. Said she wanted an update on something…”

“And you gave her the pie?”

“I didn’t think you’d mind. I wasn’t hungry and you know what aeroplane food is like. If they don’t kill you with the turbulence, they try to with the food.”

***

Photography courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.


Smile

215 smile 50291“Don’t look at her like that!”

“Like what?”

“You smiled.”

“So? She smiled at me first.”

“She shouldn’t have.”

“It’s a ‘thank you’ smile. I’ve just bought something from her.”

“That wasn’t a ‘thank you’ smile.”

“What was it then?”

“It was a ‘I want to get inside your jeans’ smile.”

“Don’t be ridiculous. She’s got to be 50 at least, old enough to be my mother.”

“That’s not stopped you before.”

“That’s not fair! She was only 39 – 14 years older. Thirteen and a half… and a bit.”

“Exactly. Old enough to be-”

“Not legally.”

“But physically.”

“Are we going to have this every time we go out somewhere?”

“When you smile like that, yes.”

“So I can’t even buy anything now?”

“Of course.”

“Thank you.”

“Just don’t-”

“Oh Alicia, grow up!”

“Mark. I’m 15. What do you expect?”

***

Picture above courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.


Talking when we could be walking

“Oh no! Is it really eleven already?”

“You’ve got plenty of time.”

“Dad, I’m supposed to be there at midday.”

“And only it’s a ten-minute drive. Fifty minutes easily.”

“I don’t want to be there on the dot! I want to be a bit early.”

29 bride 182383“Brides aren’t supposed to be early. It’s tradition.”

“Well, I certainly don’t want to be late. What time is the car booked for?”

“Eleven. You know that. It’s downstairs but we have it until it drops you and Alex at the reception.”

“Have you spoken to Alex today?”

“No, Suzie. Why would I?”

“Just to check that everything’s OK.”

“It’ll be fine. Stop panicking.”

“Something’s going to go wrong. I can feel it.”

“Nothing’s going to go wrong. You’re a secretary. Everything’s precision-timed.”

“But I should have been ready by now.”

“You look ready to me and you look gorgeous. Your mother would have-”

“Dad, don’t! You’ll set me off and Tracey’s done my make up.”

“Is there anything else to do?”

“Erm… no, I don’t think so.”

“OK. So you’re ready. The bridesmaids are ready.”

“The bridesmaids! How are they getting there?”

“Uncle Nick’s taking them. Don’t panic!”

“Oh, yes. Sorry. I know. I’m making-”

“A mountain out of a proverbial molehill. It’s your prerogative but just enjoy the day.”

“OK. Thanks, Dad.”

*

“What was that noise?”

“Just a bad gear change, I think. Nothing to worry about. The driver knows what he’s doing.”

“I knew we should have left earlier.”

“But then we’d be too early and we’d be driving round in circles.”

“You’re right as alw- What was that?”

“It didn’t sound good.”

“We’re slowing down! There’s smoke!”

“Oh dear. Never mind, we’ll get a lift with Uncle Terry and the bridesmaids.”

“Everyone else has left already.”

“So he’ll be available to come and get you. Ring him on your mobile.”

“I don’t have my mobile, Dad. Wedding dresses don’t come with pockets.”

“But you’ve got a bag.”

“Horseshoe, flowers. Two hands so no, no bag. I told you you should get a phone.”

“Never needed one. You only live round the corner.”

“Oh, Dad. What are we going to do?”

“Maybe the driver’s… no? That’s ridic- You’d think he’d have some way of communicating with his company. How is he supposed to tell them… We’ll have to walk. We’ve got time.”

“It’s at least a mile.”

“We’ve got half an hour. Twenty minutes a mile.”

“Maybe we can find a phone box.”

“Have you got change?”

“No. I told you, no pockets. Don’t tell me you don’t have any.”

“I’ve only brought my wallet. It doesn’t have a change”

“So you’ve got money.”

“While we’re sitting here talking when we could be walking.”

“I’m going to cry.”

“Don’t. Tracey’s done your make up. Come on. If we chat while we’re walking we’ll be there in no time.”

“Thanks, Dad.”

“That’s what I’m here for. It’s alright, Frank. Not your fault. We’ll make our own way but please be there when we come out. OK? Thanks.”

“Oh, God.”

“What?”

“I didn’t think about getting to the reception.”

“Don’t worry, Suzie. We can take Uncle Terry’s car. There’ll be plenty of other people who can take the bridesmaids.”

“This is not how I had it planned.”

“I know but as long as you get there.”

“These shoes are killing me already. I only needed to walk-”

“What?”

“The police car’s stopping. You don’t think…”

“You never know.”

“He’s getting out, opening the back door. Yes, Dad!”

“Hello, Officer. St Barnaby. The car broke… It’s very kind of you.”

“Yes. Thank you!”

*

“Thank you again, Officer.”

“Thank you so much.”

“Hurry, Dad!”

“It’s five to. We’re fine. Slow down. Breathe.”

“Yes, Dad. OK. Calm, Suzie… calm.”

“Step… step… three… four… There’s the music. We’re here. We’ve arrived. You’re going to get married.”

“Look! There’s Alex. Doesn’t she look lovely?”

“Yes, Suzie. Suit and all, but yes, she looks lovely.”

***

Picture above courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.


Progress

16 construction 25399“Remember when this was fields?”

“I do. Not all that long ago.”

“Ten years, just over. A month or two after Sally and Ben got engaged. They were one of the first to buy here.”

“Oh, yes. Paid a fortune too, if I remember.”

“A small fortunate, yes, but they wanted eco-friendly and the King was pushing for that so of course everything cost more.”

“King Charles? Was he on the throne already by then?”

“Not long before. 12th June 2014. Ben’s 30th birthday. The Queen abdicated on Sally’s; 15th May. Guess it came as a bit of a shock so it took them a while to sort out the paperwork.”

“Sally and Ben?”

“No. The coronation. The government.”

“Oh, yes. Nice party. This drinks party, I mean, not the government…”

“Isn’t it? Not many faces I recognise though.”

“Me neither. Bit of a relief to see you, if I’m honest.”

“Likewise. They’ve started digging up old Jack Tyler’s land.”

“Have they? For houses?”

“1,000.”

“No!”

“Yeah. Can you imagine?”

“Not really. 1,000 on the bit of land behind the farm?”

“Oh no, the whole thing.”

“What? What’s going to happen to the house?”

“Flatten. I think they’ve done it already.”

“That lovely old-”

“Progress.”

“So where’s Jack gone?”

“You haven’t heard?”

“Heard what?”

“Heart attack.”

“No! When?”

“When he got the letter offering seventy million.”

“Seventy million? What happened to that?”

“The son got it.”

“Jack had a son?”

“Lives in the States. Married a girl over there and stayed. Didn’t want the farm, of course.”

“Who would when offered that much.”

“The son.”

“Never saw him visit.”

“Think they fell out.”

“Reconciled after this death, though, didn’t they. 1,000 homes. Wow. The council will grant anything these days.”

“It’s the government push… since the shuttles started bringing the… you know, the legal aliens.”

“Of course, but people are leaving too, though, aren’t they?”

“Not as many. We have more resources here.”

“True, but Mars is young and you’d think exciting.”

“Fine for single people, but most have families these days, especially given the couple’s bonuses shooting up since the housing crisis came to the fore, and most wives would be more traditional, you know, happier to stay put. They’ll wait for Mars to be established then they’ll go. If they go. Most can’t afford it.”

“Can if they have farms to sell.”

“Yeah. If only…”

“Well, better mingle.”

“Me too. Nice to see you again.”

“You too.”

***

Picture above courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.


The Ramshackle Writer

14 cabin 857434On the edge of the mountain, silhouetted against the setting sun, there is a small ramshackle cottage made of wood. It looks like any ordinary cottage but it’s the stuff of legends, the owner, the hero of legends.

Or so he thought.

“Tommy!”

No, that’s terrible.

On the edge of the mountain, silhouetted against the setting sun, there is a small ramshackle cottage made of wood. Wood collected from the forest at the top of the mountain.

Jack pulled the piece of paper from his typewriter, screwed it up and threw it at the bin. It missed, and became just one of a pile of screwed up pieces of paper.

On the edge of the mountain, silhouetted against the setting sun, there is a small ramshackle cottage made of wood. Inside sits a writer with writer’s block.

“How’s it coming?” Nancy, Jack’s long-suffering wife looked over his shoulder. “Oh dear.”

“Yes, exactly.”

“It’s a bit ‘Dark and stormy night’.”

“I know, but it’s the prompt for today.”

“Can’t you change it?”

“We can but I like to stick with what we’re given.”

“It is only for fun.”

“And to put on my blog. By five o’clock.”

Nancy looked at her watch. 5.25.

“I know. I can backtime it.

“Backtime? Is that even a word?”

“Don’t know. Backdate is.”

“If you used a computer like everyone else, it would underline it if it wasn’t a word.”

“It doesn’t matter. I’m a writer, I can make up words.”

“Why don’t you?”

“Why don’t I what?”

“Use a computer like everyone else.”

“It feels… I don’t know. It feels more authentic. Like Stephen King. Very… Secret Window.”

“Terrible movie.”

“I know. It’s all a dream and all that. But I’m more productive this way. My ideas flow better.”

“They’re not flowing today.”

“I know, but that’s not the typewriter, it’s the prompt.”

“Then pick another one.”

“No, I’ll persevere.”

Nancy shrugged. “OK, but don’t blame me if…” The rest was lost as she went into the kitchen.

“Another prompt,” Jack mumbled as he pulled out the paper, screwed it up and launched it at the bin. It hit the edge but fell in. He clapped, laughed and put another piece of paper into the typewriter, twisting down the end, until the paper was sticking out a couple of inches from the top.

“Another prompt…”

He sat up straight, hovered his fingers, claw-like, over the keys and started tapping.

It was a dark and stormy night…

***

Picture above courtesy of morguefile.com.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to the mixed blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. If there’s anything you’d like to take part in, take a look at Opportunities on this blog.

I welcome items for critique for the online writing groups listed below:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.



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